Queer Book Diorama Show at NYPL’s Jefferson Market branch

For many LGBTQ people, books are the first place where we see pieces of ourselves and our identities come alive, making books critical to the process of identity formation. This fall Pop-Up Founding Director Hugh Ryan and award winning queer author Sassafras Lowrey are co-curating an exhibit at the New York Public Library Jefferson Market Branch sponsored by the Pop-Up Museum of Queer History and Lambda Literary Foundation highlighting the unique relationship between LGBTQ people and literature. Books can be lifelines for LGBTQ people isolated by geographic area or other life circumstances, and we seek to break down the divide between the author and reader, to create conversation through art exploring the role of the queer book within our community.

Responding to an international call for participation, LGBTQ artists from the United States, Canada, and South Africa are creating dioramas depicting books that contributed to their formation of understanding themselves as LGBTQ people. This is a community project bringing together diverse artists across age and experience. Through the Queer Diorama Show we seek to increase conversation about the important role books play in one’s queer coming of age. We will be exploring queer readings of mainstream titles, as well as the pull of explicitly queer texts.

more here!

Tuesday Tech: Mango Premiere - using feature films to learn languages

Mango Languages now has Mango Premiere!

Mango Languages is already a great tool to learn languages online (akin to the Rosetta Stone of yore)—but now it also has the option to use popular feature films as a learning tool!

It currently features films in French, German, Italian, Mandarin and Spanish.

To access the Mango Premiere feature in Mango Languages, either use the search tool on the left and search “Premiere” to get a full listing of all films available, or you can click on one of the languages listed above and it will give you a separate “Mango Premiere” tab with the films listed (you can see the second one in the screencap above).

If you have a Brooklyn Public Library card, you can access Mango Languages and Premiere from home either by following the links from the BPL website in Articles and Databases or by clicking here.

A Guide to Independent Bookstores in Brooklyn - via Brooklyn Magazine

We’re psyched to see PowerUP! Business Plan Competition winner, Greenlight Bookstore, on this list!

Greenlight Bookstore 686 Fulton St, Fort Greene. Just a single pane of glass removed from the bustle of Fulton Street (well, the bustle of Habana Outpost in the summer), in the shadow of the Biggie mural, Greenlight Bookstore is deceptively wee (that’s “wee” not “twee,”). The bright, triangular shop is home to an expansive kids’ section, heaping tables of new fiction and nonfiction, a cookbook selection with some coffee table–worthy deep cuts, and one of the more carefully curated selection of lit mags in the borough. Greenlight also has some truly sweet totes, so show your Fort Greene love!

Check out the rest, here!

How Common Core’s recommended books fail children of color- via The Washington Post

(By Astrid Riecken/FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

"Critics of the Common Core  have questioned a number of different aspects of the standards, including how they were written, whether they are developmentally appropriate and whether too much emphasis has been placed on non-fiction at the cost of literature. Here is a look at an issue that has gotten little attention: How the recommended books in the appendix of the standards try to meet the needs of students of color….

Children of color and the poor make up more than half the children in the United States. According to the latest census, 16.4 million children (22 percent) live in poverty), and close to 50 percent of country’s children combined are of African American, Hispanic, American Indian, Asian American heritage. When the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) were introduced in 2009—2010 , the literacy needs of half the children in the United States were neglected. Of 171 texts recommended for elementary children in Appendix B of the CCSS, there are only 18 by authors of color, and few books reflect the lives of children of color and the poor.”Continue reading, here.

Wednesday night we had a great event in the Info Commons on 3D Printing in Libraries with folks from Shapeways and a few of own Brooklyn Public Library staff to discuss how they are using 3D printing in library programs and services, and how 3D printing can fit into public and educational programs at libraries and schools.
For more from Shapeways, check out their blog here: http://www.shapeways.com/blog/.

Wednesday night we had a great event in the Info Commons on 3D Printing in Libraries with folks from Shapeways and a few of own Brooklyn Public Library staff to discuss how they are using 3D printing in library programs and services, and how 3D printing can fit into public and educational programs at libraries and schools.

For more from Shapeways, check out their blog here: http://www.shapeways.com/blog/.

The Wednesday Biz: Get the Facts About Your Money

Get the Facts About Your Money

Join us on Monday, September 29 at 6:00 pm in the Trustees’ Room at Central Library for this great program to learn all about debt, finance and more!

  • Confused about the fees charged by banks and credit card companies?

    Wondering about the costs associated with getting a mortgage?

    Concerned about going into debt to go to college?

    Need help making sense of the complex world of finance?

    Meet experts from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the new federal agency mandated to protect you from deceptive and misleading practices, to get the unbiased information you need.  This seminar will introduce you to resources you can rely on and explain how to get the assistance you need to meet the challenges of today’s economy. The Business & Career Library is presenting this program.

    Please register at www.bklynlibrary.org/locations/business/events or call 718.623.7000 and select option 4.